Appetizers/Small Plates · Seafood

Seafood with Chinese Chive Dumplings

April 2018 Fam Din
Remember these beauties?

They were one of the gajillion dumplings I had made for my Lucasaurus’ bday Fam Din.

It’s only fitting. He’s one of the generals in my Dumpling Army after all.

Seafood & Chinese Chive Dumplings
Since the other dumplings were filled with either pork or chicken, it was a no-brainer that a seafood version had to join the party. I opted for a combo of shrimp and scallops but really, you can use anything you’d like.

And a perfect pairing to seafood are Chinese Chives — also known as Garlic Chives. Chinese Chives have a flavor that is a mix between scallions and onions –and they are HIGHLY aromatic.

Seafood & Chinese Chive Dumplings
I use pre-packaged skins for these Seafood and Chinese Chives Dumplings and prefer the Shanghai style wrappers. I like their thinness and color once cooked.

Pan-Fried Ginger Chicken Dumplings
I usually have a few packages tucked in my freezer for those times when I’m inspired to restock my dumplings stash.

Seafood & Chinese Chive Dumplings

Aren’t they adorable? Like little pouches?

Seafood & Chinese Chive Dumplings
Or like a roly poly?

Delicious — however you see them.

Seafood & Chinese Chive Dumplings
When it’s time to cook them, just line a steamer with either cabbage leaves….

Seafood & Chinese Chive Dumplings
…or sheets of parchment paper with holes cut into them. The holes allow the steam to vent through the levels and cook the dumplings through.

April 2018 Fam Din
After about 8 minutes – voila!

April 2018 Fam Din
Super juicy, plump and perfect when dunked in the soy-vinegar-chili-sesame sauce I’ve included below.

April 2018 Fam Din
Hope you like them! ❤

______________________________________________________________________________
Seafood with Chive Dumplings
Makes approximately 50-75 dumpings

Dumplings:
2 cups Chinese chives, roughly chopped
1 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
4 garlic cloves
1 small shallot
1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 pound scallops
2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine or other preferred rice wine
2 tablespoons soy sauce, more to taste
2 tablespoons fish sauce, more to taste
1 tablespoon sesame oil
½ tablespoon sugar
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
½ teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)
50-75 Shanghai style dumpling skins
cabbage leaves for steaming (optional)
chopped scallions and toasted sesame seeds for garnish

Dipping Sauce:
4 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinkiang Black Vinegar
1 tablespoon sesame oil
½ tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoons homemade Sichuan Chili Oil (both the oil and flakes)

Place the chives, ginger, garlic and shallot in a food processor. Pulse several times until all of the ingredients have broken down and become roughly the same minced texture. Add the shrimp and scallops. Pulse until the seafood is chopped but not so much that it turns into a paste – you still want some pieces for texture. Add Shaoxing wine, soy sauce, fish sauce, sesame oil, sugar and peppers. Pulse just until the ingredients have combined. Note: You can also due this all by hand but I love the convenience of using a food processor.

Test the filling for seasoning by taking a small spoonful of the mixture and pan fry in a nonstick skillet for 1-2 minutes on each side. Taste and if needed, add more soy sauce or fish sauce to the uncooked filling.

Begin assembly of the dumplings. Lay one dumpling skin on a flat surface. Dip your finger in water and moisten the edge of the wrapper. Place about 1 heaping teaspoon of the filling in the center of the dumpling skin. Next, choose one of the four following easy methods to seal the dumplings:

  1. Pick up the dumpling, fold it in half into a crescent shape and seal the entire edge by pinching the seam together. These dumplings will lay flat like my Sui Gao. -OR-
  2. Pick up the dumpling, fold it in half into a crescent. Starting from the left side, pleat – fold – and press the edges together, ensuring that you seal the entire dumpling tightly. These dumplings will lay flat but pleated like my Gyoza. -OR-
  3. Pick up the dumpling, fold it in half into a crescent and pinch the center together. Starting from the center, make about 3-4 pleats on the right side of the dumpling. Repeat with the left side of the dumpling so that all the pleats point towards the center. This will create a flat bottom to allow the dumpling to sit upright and form a slight crescent shape like these Pan Fried Dumplings. -OR-
  4. Pick up the dumpling, fold it in half into a crescent shape and seal the entire edge by pinching the seam together. Next, create pleats from the left side all the way to the right side—pinching well to hold. *This is how the dumplings in these photos were folded.

Whichever method you choose, place the filled dumpling on a baking sheet and continue until all the filling/skins have been used. Arrange the dumplings in a steamer (lined with cabbage leaves or parchment paper) and steam for 8-10 minutes.

While the dumplings steam, whisk all of the ingredients together for the dipping sauce and set aside.

Once the dumplings are steamed, transfer to a platter and sprinkle the scallions and sesame seeds on top. Serve immediately with sauce. ENJOY!

*If you would like to freeze the dumplings, place the baking sheet directly into freezer for 4-5 hours after you have assembled them. Be sure that the dumplings are in a single layer and are not touching each other. Once the dumplings have froze, you may transfer them to a sealed container. They can be kept in the freezer for a few months and should be cooked frozen. Add 1-2 additional minutes to the cooking time when steaming the dumplings.*

 

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Sunday Family Dinner

Kamayan Family Dinner – Masarap!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
At least one of the Family Dinners each year is truly epic. Sure, most months are delicious and we definitely put a lot of effort into them. But for these particular memorable dinners, we go EXTRA on the theme, make more dishes than usual and perhaps more shenanigans occur. Months like our Seafood Boil  or Lūʻau jump quickly to mind.

But so far, 2018 has had a few milestone dinners. The first of which was for my birth-month!

Okay more accurately, it was also L and Dad‘s birth-month celebration too!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

Per usual, we started brainstorming the month before.

Right off the bat, Dad said he wanted Prime Rib and Chocolate Ice Cream. The man didn’t even take more than a few seconds to decide.

L said maybe sashimi? Maybe seafood? She was pretty open to things.

I thought maybe a sliders bar would be fun. A bunch of little burgers with a ton of different toppings to choose from?

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

And then throughout the course of a couple of weeks and several text chains later, a theme out of left field emerged – a Kamayan Feast!

“Kamayan” is the Filipino traditional custom of eating solely with your hands that was prevalent prior to their Spanish colonization. These days, Kamayan occurs for holidays or celebrations and the sure telltale sign is a table covered with banana leaves and then piled high with a feast of customary Filipino foods. The usual suspects are roast pork, seafood, rice, lumpia, pancit, grilled vegetables and fresh fruit. Think family style–gone BIG!

For years now, folks (including B.I.L) have wondered why we haven’t chosen Filipino cuisine as one of our monthly themes. Sure, both B.I.L. R and S.I.L. L identify with their Filipino heritage (and thus a few of munchkins share that lineage) but it just never came to fruition.

Until now.

Let the Kamayan begin!!!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

And what made Fam Din extra special that month? It was the first time V and L hosted at their new digs!

Their clan relocated from NY about two years ago and officially moved into L’s childhood home. There’s been a lot of re-organizing and de-cluttering that’s been happening over the past several months but they were finally ready to welcome the tribe in! They’ve got lots of plans for remodeling and so forth – I love the place. It’s got a great vibe and let’s face it, the flow for a wonderful home to entertain in!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
The thing about Kamayan is that the feast happens all at once. There’s no multiple courses as it’s all served in one gigantic, delicious pile!

The “low fuss” approach gave R some time to sit down and relax with a cigar that he picked up when we were in NoLA the week before.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

And with all Fam Dins, it gave the munchkins LOTS of time to hang out and spend QT with each other. That’s my favorite part of it all.

And I mean, the tasty food isn’t bad motivation either.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Nina is a wonderful big cousie ❤

Did I tell you she’s 20 now?

Seriously, my heart hurts just thinking of it.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

Approved Graffiti Activities.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
I hope they look back on pictures like this years from now with their own little munckhins—remembering what a special family they are a part of. ❤

Ugh…there goes the heart hurting again….

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
V took this opportunity to try and shank T with a pair of tongs.

Big brothers will always be big brothers.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

Speaking of T, she scored a bunch of homegrown blood oranges from a friend. So she busted out the electric citrus juicer (a serious game changer people, trust us) and was left with a quart of beautiful juice.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

We used up the juice for Mimosas and they were fantastic!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
And then it came time for me to put the munchkins to work.

In my opinion, if we’re doing Filipino cuisine, Lumpia Shanghai must be on the menu! It’s their take on eggrolls/fried spring rolls and that night I chose to make the filling with a combo of ground chicken and shrimp.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
We had quite the assembly line going!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Nini is quite skilled at meticulous tasks. Look at how perfect her lumpia turned out?

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Yup, totally would hire her if we went pro.

And by “hire”, I mean she would be “volun-told”.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
She did so well that I gave her a break to snuggle with her fur cousin in the hammock while I fried the Lumpia.

Actually those two are often snuggle buddies ❤

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Then R was up to bat with his mom’s recipe for Bistek Tagalog.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Bistek Tagalog are beef slices braised and browned in soy, garlic and either vinegar or calamansi juice. It’s then topped with thick slices of browned onions.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Quick Bistek break to take a pic with N!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
As you might’ve noticed above, we had deep friend Golden Pompano that L picked up. To keep it crispy, we kept it in the oven on a sheet pan on low heat.

And of course it’s got to be whole fish!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Dad never really knows what the theme of our family dinners are until he shows up. So you can imagine our surprise when he showed up with a ginormous 40lb Jackfruit – FRESH! It was perfect to have the distinct tropical fruit join the Kamayan table!

In the pic below you can see that he’s wearing latex gloves. It’s because the sap of the jackfruit is incredibly sticky that gloves are a must! It’s also a good tip to use some light vegetable oil to wipe the blade of your knife after every couple of slices. If not, you’re left with rather a big mess.

Jackfruit is delicious but highly laborious.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
T and Maya also introduced Dad to Snapchat filters that day. He was THOROUGHLY amused.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Nina was on produce duty! Fresh pineapple, mangoes, cucumbers and tomatoes.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
L got in on the action too!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Then it was time for V to fire up the grill! Here he is charring up a bunch of Baby Bok Choy and Longanisa. Longanisa is a slightly sweet, Spanish influenced sausage that can often be found at Filipino breakfasts.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
I admit it.

I didn’t make the longanisa – I picked it up at the Asian supermarket. I know, I know….but I didn’t have time and really wanted some on the table.

Sorry!!!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
V also grilled up the Eggplant that L sliced earlier.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Then it was onto the seafood. Got to have LOTS of seafood at a Kamayan feast!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Did I mention that Dad loves it when we all cook for him? I mean, with five kids that love to cook, he’s in good hands.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Grilled Whole Shrimp and Squid – tasty!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
While the cooking was going down, Luna continued her training as Ollivander’s apprentice. Our niece has an affinity with the world of Harry Potter (much to her aunties’ delight!) and since she’s so crafty, she makes her own wands!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
For those that follow me on Instagram, you may have seen the Elder Wand she created for me. Incredible, right?

When T saw it, she declared she needed one too – so Luna went to work!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Auntie and niece casting spells … both of whom were sorted into Hufflepuff. Yours truly is a Ravenclaw.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
For the record, not all faces are happy all of the time at Fam Din.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Then it was time to take my baby out of the oven – Oven Roasted Lechon Kawali.

Many Filipino feasts showcase whole roast pig. The pork is always so juicy and tender—and OH THAT CRACKLING!!!

To Die For!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
But as gluttonous as our Fam Dins can be, an entire pig seemed a bit much. Even for our standards!

Instead, I took a big ol’ slab of pork belly, brined it with a bunch of aromatics overnight and then rolled it up with some goodness inside. I then brushed the exterior with milk so that it would take on a beautiful color, roasted it (think of porchetta) and TA-DA!

The chicharrón was so crispy! It made me so happy that I did a little dance once it came out.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
With all the pieces done, it was finally time to assemble the table!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
First step was to cover our long table with banana leaves. Not only did it act as a decorative table “cloth” but once the hot food was piled on top, the heat released the natural oils from the leaves and left everything with a light fragrance and depth of flavor.

Note: If you use frozen banana leaves from the Asian grocery store like we did, be sure to rinse/wipe the leaves down before adding the food on top as there’s usually a bit of dirt remaining.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam DinNext, we made a long row of fresh steamed rice. Got to have a solid base right?

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Then everything was piled on top!

  • Dad’s Roast Beef (not traditional for a Kamayan but bday boy did request it!)
  • Oven Roasted Lechon Kawali
  • Bistek Tagalog
  • Grilled Longanisa
  • Crispy Fried Golden Pompano
  • Grilled Shrimp and Squid
  • Lumpia Shanghai
  • Charred Baby Bok Choy and Eggplant
  • Fresh Cucumber and Tomatoes
  • Fresh Jackfruit, Pineapple, Mango
  • Dipping Sauces: Prime Rib Au Jus, Suka (Filipino Cane Vinegar), Fish Sauce with Chiles

You want to dive right in, don’t you? I don’t blame you.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Nina’s doing her “low key” food photography.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
And so was Nini.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
When these two seesters aren’t bickering, they are quite adorable.

Hmmm…sound familiar?

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
There was A LOT going on.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Bella was supervising.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
The Bulaons!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
The Les!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
I have no idea why I don’t have a fam pic of the Nguyens. SORRY DUDES!

But I do have these of Dad and I!

It’s so blurry but I like both of the expressions on our faces. Dad is rather foodstruck and I am just giddy.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Pops!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Say Kamayan!

ps. Please don’t give me crap about the Seahawks hat. He didn’t inherit that fanaticism from me. Go VIKES!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
WE. WERE. SO. STUFFED.

Everything was delicious. Each component hit a different note.

MASARAP! (Translation: Delicious!)

After the dinner, we needed to clean up and digest everything.

COMMENCE THE SHENANIGANS!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
You just know I had to get in on it.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Btw, this is Primo…the ceramic pug that protects the house.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
And last, there was my one request – Chocolate Marble Cake!

Growing up, it was my favorite — a dense yellow cake with swirls of chocolate. What could be better?

So seester N took up the dessert helm and made this beauty for us.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
That cake seriously weighed like 15lbs!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Making wishes!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
Lovely layers!

She also made Chocolate Ice Cream (per Dad’s request) and Vietnamese Coffee Ice Creambecause we like options.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din
More cuddles and QT in the sunken conversation pit.

As far as I’m concerned, every house needs a “conversation pit” that is connected to the fire place.

Having  a bar nearby doesn’t hurt either — refer to top left corner below.

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

Our Kamayan Feast was truly so epic. And it wasn’t just the caliber of the food–it was the entire day/night!

Nini ended up taking a ton of videos that day so I asked Nina to edit them together for a quick video. When you have a moment, check it below.

I should hire them for my marketing team. Thanks, Girls!

And that’s a wrap on our Kamayan Fam Din! It will definitely be in our memories for a long time to come!

May 2018-Kamayan Fam Din

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This Month’s Family Dinner Menu

Cocktails: Blood Orange Mimosas, Various Wines
Kamayan Table: Dad’s Roast Beef, Oven Roasted Lechon Kawali, Bistek Tagalog, Grilled Longanisa, Crispy Fried Golden Pompano, Grilled Shrimp and Squid, Lumpia Shanghai, Charred Baby Bok Choy and Eggplant, Fresh Cucumber and Tomatoes, Fresh Jackfruit, Pineapple, Mango
Dessert: Marble Cake, Homemade Chocolate Ice Cream, Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream

 

Vietnamese

Hủ Tiếu {Vietnamese Pork and Seafood Noodle Soup}

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
The East Coast has been experiencing some crazy snow storms lately –to the point that I’m sure that the White Walkers are just vacationing around there until Season 8 of GoT is released. Or at least until a release date is announced.

Just thinking about it makes me shudder and want to bundle up. But before you laugh at me, know that it’s actually been cold in San Diego these past few weeks—even by non-Southern Californian terms. We’re talking in the 30 degrees F in the late nights/early mornings! BRRRRRR!!!!

Maybe a straggling Walker wanted to check out Disneyland?

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
I’m constantly cold. Which is why I have been nonstop cooking and eating soups lately–noodle soups, mostly. Can you blame me?

I’ve been getting my full of chowders, ramen, wonton noodle soups and of course, Phở. Hey-I need comfort food! But as much as I love phở, there are so many other noodle dishes in Vietnamese cuisine than the popular soup.

There’s Miến (glass noodles), Bún Riêu (tomato & freshwater crab noodles), Bánh Canh (Udon-like noodles), Bún Măng Vịt (bamboo and duck noodles) and Bún Thang (Northern Vietnamese chicken-based noodles)……

But my favorites are Bún Bò Huế (spicy beef noodles) and Mì Quảng (seafood & pork turmeric noodles).

SUPER NGON!!!

Translation: SUPER DELICIOUS!!!

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang

Though I’ve got to tell  you — I do LOVE me a big bowl of Hủ Tiếu.

Which type of Hủ Tiếu?

Well, that’s where things get a bit difficult because depending on who you ask, the “variations”, well…….vary.

There’s Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang which is considered the Vietnamese version of the Cambodian noodle soup from Phnom Penh.

There’s Hủ Tiếu Mỹ Tho which is the signature noodle dish of the city Mỹ Tho located in the Tiền Giang Province on the Mekong Delta.

And there’s also Hủ Tiếu Tàu, which just translates to Chinese Hủ Tiếu. Yeah…they could have been more creative with that one.

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang

What are the origins of Hủ Tiếu?

Whelp, other than the fact that it originates from China and somehow blended its way through Southeast Asia, everything else is a bit fuzzy. But it has become iconic in Southern Việt Nam and most can at least agree that the broth is pork bone based.

Oh…I forgot to mention that on top of the different the types of Hủ Tiếu you order, you can choose to have it khô (dry noodles served with a dark salty-sweet sauce and the broth on the side) or with nước (broth and noodles served together).

I know….we’re a complicated bunch. But we’re a People that like options.

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
So which type of Hủ Tiếu do I make?

I can’t really say it’s traditionally Mỹ Tho or Nam Vang. And I’ve got to admit, although it sounds trivial, it’s definitely times like these that I wish I could ask Mom. Would she have the right answer? Eh…questionable. But she’d likely give me a confident answer and just tell me to do what tastes good.

Smart woman.

So that’s what I do.

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
I enjoy Hủ Tiếu broth because it’s light, slightly sweet and not as spice-forward as phở. Again, I do adore phở –but it’s good to have options. But like phở, it should be wonderfully clear like a beautiful consommé.

Most Hủ Tiếu broths start off with lots of pork bones but I like to add chicken bones too. Why miss an opportunity to have a richer broth right?

To start on that consommé-like path, you’ve got to give the bones a good scrub down. Mom always taught us to clean bones and all proteins first before cooking by exfoliating it with salt and thoroughly rinsing it. Then you’ll need to parboil the bones for several minutes, dump out the water and rinse off any of the impurities that have come out before starting the broth in a clean pot.

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
I then throw in some onions, shallots and to provide some sweetness– daikon and dried shrimp. This is when you can also add dried squid that has been rehydrated. I didn’t have any on hand when I made this batch but I will next time. Following those ingredients are some dried shiitake mushrooms (not traditional but I like the added depth of flavor), salt and rock sugar. Once you’ve gotten to this point, let the broth simmer on very low but steady heat for about 2½-3 hours.

And remember that consommé-like goal we’re aiming for? It’s this low and slow simmer that seals the deal. That and also skimming the broth every 30 minutes or so to discard of any impurities that may have risen to top.

I know —this is a labor of love….for my stomach.

I should note that traditionally the broth is seasoned with only salt and not fish sauce. But I’ll admit it, after the broth has simmered for a few hours, I’ve been known to throw in a few dashes of Vietnamese liquid gold if I feel that it needs a bit more magic.

I’m a rebel.

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
Now let’s spend a few moments talking about toppings, shall we?

I believe across the board for Hủ Tiếu, you’ll find that there will be some variation of pork and whole shrimp. But when it comes to everything else–it’s all fair game.

Common items in various Hủ Tiếu are boiled quail eggs, offal, Vietnamese ham, fried shrimp crisp and sliced beef. And when it comes to pork, it can come in the form of poached, ground or  Chinese “barbecue” known as char sui or xá xíu.

They also say that Hủ Tiếu Mỹ Tho should have an abundance of seafood so in addition to the usual suspects, you’ll find toppings like crab claws, squid, fish balls, imitation crab, fish and so forth.

For me, I’m not a fan of many offals, let alone poached pork liver. Don’t get me wrong– I do love a good pâté but liver in this soup form has never got me excited. So I don’t include it. And as much as I love all kinds of eggs, boiling and peeling them are just too tedious for me –so I nix those too. And no–I don’t buy or enjoy canned quail eggs. They taste very metallic to me.

I generally stick to the basics such as poached shrimp, imitation crab and browned ground pork. But if I really feel like going the extra mile (or if I was smart and kept a stash in the freezer), I’ll make xá xíu, too.

Oh–and don’t forget the accompanying veggies, herbs, chilies and fresh lime!

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
Now let’s talk about the noodle types.

One of the reasons why I like Hủ Tiếu so much is that most of the time, it is served with what is called Hủ Tiếu Dai which are tapioca based noodles. The texture is much more firm than phở noodles have — which are typically rice flour based. Hủ Tiếu Dai are chewy in similar ways to why I adore bucatini pasta  – but without the hole in the center of the noodle. Delish.

But you can also find Hủ Tiếu served with standard rice noodles or even Chinese egg noodles. In those cases, it’s called Hủ Tiếu Mi – also good, but just different. And if you can’t decide which you prefer, some places will serve the different noodles mixed together for you!

Told you we like options.

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang
Lastly, let’s chat a bit more about what I mentioned earlier on having it served khô or with nước.

If you were to ask for a bowl of Hủ Tiếu (whether it be Nam Vang, Mỹ Tho or Tàu), you’ll likely have a wonderful steaming bowl of noodle soup delivered to you. The noodles and broth are in one bowl — and it’s a party. Sometimes they’ll call it Hủ Tiếu Nước (with broth) but generally if you say “Hủ Tiếu”, that’s what you’ll get. And it’s glorious.

However, some spots will have Hủ Tiếu Khô available and I’ll tell you, it’s also glorious. Essentially, the bowls are assembled nearly the same with the exception of two things. The noodles will have a rich salty-sweet sauce either drizzled on top or underneath the noodles and the the broth will be served in a small bowl on the side. You’ll stir the noodles up with that rich sauce — and of course you can pour some of the broth in it too. But this way, you’ll get to enjoy the flavors of the noodles, toppings sauce and then slurp the broth separately. And I’ll tell ya, when I was young, I wasn’t really much into the broths of noodle soups. Sure–I liked some of it but I was more focused on the GOODS! This method was perfect for me! Plus, the sauce adds another level of flavor—yes, it too, is glorious.

Nowadays I enjoy both so don’t make me pick sides.

Hủ Tiếu Nam Vang

I know. Probably more than you ever wanted to know about Hủ Tiếu but I was feeling wordy today. I blame it on the weather. ❤

Ăn Ngon!

________________________________________________________________
Hủ Tiếu {Vietnamese Pork and Seafood Noodle Soup}
Makes approximately 6 bowls

Ingredients:

 

4 pounds pork bones
2 pounds chicken bones
kosher salt
water
1 large yellow onion, quartered
1 large shallot (or 2 small ones), quartered
1 medium-sized daikon, peeled and cut into small chunks
1 ounce dried shiitake mushrooms
1 small rock sugar piece, about 1 tablespoon
½ cup dried shrimp that has been rehydrated with boiling water, rinsed and drained
3-4 dried squid that has been rehydrated with boiling water, rinsed and drained
1 tablespoon peppercorns
1 pound ground pork
½ tablespoon fish sauce
½ teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
½ pound shrimp, shelled and deveined
1 package Hủ Tiếu Dai– chewy tapioca noodles
¼ pound imitation crab, cut into 2 inch pieces
herbs and veggies: fried shallots, fried garlic, bean sprouts, cilantro, culantro, chilies, limes, scallions, etc.
other protein options: pork slices (poached or char sui/xá xíu), boiled quail eggs, liver or other offal, sliced squid, etc.

Sauce for serving Hủ Tiếu Khô:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoons minced shallots
2 garlic cloves, minced
¼ teaspoon 5 spice powder
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons oyster sauce
½ cup Hủ Tiếu broth

Place the pork and chicken bones in the sink and liberally sprinkle salt over them. Using the salt as an exfoliant, scrub the bones well and rinse. Place the scrubbed bones in a large pot and cover with cold water. Set the heat to high and boil or 5-7 minutes. At this point, some of the impurities and “scum” will have boiled out. Place a colander in the sink and carefully pour the bones in to drain. Rinse the bones thoroughly to remove all the impurities. If you intend on using the same pot for the Hủ Tiếu broth, wash it well before adding the bones back in. Do not skip any of the above important steps in order to get a clear and clean broth.

Pour in about 6 quarts of water over the cleaned bones and bring to a boil. Add the onions, shallots, daikon, shiitake mushrooms, rock sugar, rehydrated shrimp, squid, peppercorns and 2-tablespoons kosher salt. Stir until the rock sugar has dissolved and lower the temperature to a gentle simmer. Allow the broth to simmer, uncovered, on very low heat for 2½-3 hours. During that time, periodically skim and discard any impurities that may have formed on top of the broth. At the end, you’ll want a semi-dark but very clear broth like a consommé. Before serving, taste the broth and add additional salt if needed.

While the broth simmers, prepare the toppings.

In a small bowl, mix the pork, fish sauce and pepper together. Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium. Sauté the garlic until fragrant but not browned. Add the pork and cook thoroughly while crumbling up the ground meat. Take off heat and set aside.

Place the shrimp in a mesh metal strainer. Dip the strainer into the simmering broth and stir the shrimp around so that it poaches in the hot liquid. Once the shrimp becomes bright pink, shake lightly to remove excess liquids and set aside.

Prepare the noodles according to the directions on the package. Usually it will instruct you to soak the noodles for 10-15 minutes in hot water and then boil for a quick few minutes before draining well. Set aside.

To assemble if serving the broth with the noodles, divide the cooked noodles among the bowls. On top of each bowl, place 3-4 poached shrimp, a couple of pieces of imitation crab and a few spoonfuls of cooked ground pork. Sprinkle on the fried garlic, fried shallots and chopped scallions. Ladle the boiling broth over the noodles and toppings. Serve with fresh herbs, chilies and limes on the side.

If serving Hủ Tiếu Khô (dry noodles), prepare the accompanying sauce by heating the oil over medium low in a small saucepan. Add the shallots and cook until just golden. Add the garlic and cook for an additional minute, stir to avoid it from burning. Sprinkle in the 5 spice powder and cook for 30 seconds before adding the remaining sauce ingredients. Raise the heat so that the liquids boil and then reduce to a simmer. Allow the sauce to cook for 2-3 additional minutes. Assemble the Hủ Tiếu Khô by adding a heaping spoonful of the dark sauce at the bottom of each bowl. Top with the cooked noodles, 3-4 poached shrimp, a couple of pieces of imitation crab and a few spoonfuls of cooked ground pork. Sprinkle on the fried garlic, fried shallots and chopped scallions. Serve with a small bowl of hot broth on the side along with fresh herbs, chilies and limes.

Seafood · Soups/Stews

Our Seafood Cioppino – Happy Birthday Mom!!!

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Today is our Mama’s birthday and although it’s been 10 years since she’s been with us, not a day goes by when we don’t miss or think of her.

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That fiery spirit that her daughters and granddaughters inherited……

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That deep sense of family, love and loyalty……

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The affinity to talk to strangers and win them over in minutes….

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That strong “will” (yes…I was trying not to say stubborn)…..

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And that love to cook and explore new cuisines.

Kids
Of course there are dishes that I cannot help but miss her dearly when I make them. Like Thịt Kho Trứng (Vietnamese Caramelized Pork and Eggs), Thịt Bò Xào (Stir-fried beef), Mì Quảng (Turmeric Noodles) or even Korean Chap Chae —all dishes I used to ask her to make for me.

But then there are dishes like Seafood Cioppino, that although wasn’t her own, has now become a staple among my siblings every time we want to celebrate Mom.

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At least a dozen years ago when I lived in San Jose, Mom came to visit me and sister P who lived in San Francisco. We spent the time walking around the city, shopping, and eating everything possible. And one night for dinner, P and I decided to make her a decadent, quintessential San Franciscan dish–Seafood Cioppino.

Mom and Nam
Cioppino is a seafood stew that originated in the Italian American communities of SF. It layers tons of aromatics with wine and tomatoes to make a fragrant stock. A variety of seafood is then cooked in the stock –which then deepens in flavor from the juices of the shellfish and seafood.

It’s incredible and we knew Mom would love it.

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While P and I spent hours in the kitchen that late afternoon charring the peppers, sauteing the veggies, simmering the stock, and cleaning all the seafood we had scored on Clement Street, Mom sat at the table watching us. She kept asking what we were doing—-and then, what we were going to next. Then she would say that we were going to a lot of trouble just for one dish.

But honestly, I think of everything we did during that visit, she loved that day the most. Chatting with her daughters while they cooked and fussed over her.

Of course, she loved the Seafood Cioppino too!

And can we just say how fabulous Mama was sitting in her satin pajamas, wearing her black Tahitian pearls while digging into a big ol’ bowl of Seafood Cioppino??

Fancy.

Shortly after Mom passed, I made a photobook for my family that included old pictures and our favorite recipes from her. And soon after, that one dish P and I made that one SF visit became “Mom’s Cioppino”—something that is lovingly made many times a year since.

Cioppino

I’ve posted tons of pics on Instagram and Facebook of our Seafood Cioppino and often get requests for the recipe. Whether it was too personal or maybe it was still too “soon”–I just wasn’t willing to share it yet.

Cioppino
After all of the years, it doesn’t get “easier” and I still miss her so much. But these days, I am able to share more things about her and now it’s rather perfect to share with you all this dish on her birthday.

Yes, there are many steps with the Cioppino and it does take some time —but the good news is, nothing is really difficult. And it’s the perfect dish to share with your loved ones when you can spend the day together in the kitchen making memories.

I hope you love it as much as we do.

Cioppino
We love you Mama and Happy, Happy Birthday!

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Seafood Cioppino

Serves 8

Ingredients:
Stock
2 red bell peppers
½ red jalapeno pepper
5 Roma tomatoes, halved
olive oil
1 medium sized white onion, diced
2 celery ribs, diced
1 fennel bulb, diced
2 large garlic cloves, smashed
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 750mL bottle white wine, such as a Sauvignon Blanc or mild White Blend
5 standard tomatoes (Mexican or Florida tomato), coarsely chopped
1 8oz bottle clam juice
½ cup tomato juice
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
sea salt
20 sprigs fresh thyme
6 springs fresh parsley
8 sprigs fresh tarragon
½ teaspoon saffron threads

Seafood (or a medley of your favorites)
2 dungeness crabs, washed and quartered
2 lobster tails, quartered
2 pounds mussels, debeared and scrubbed
2 pounds manila clams, scrubbed
1 pound firm white fish, such as halibut or mahi, cut into 1½ inch cubes
1 pound shrimp, deveined and shell intact
1 pound sea scallops, if they are large—cut them in half
½ pound calamari, cut into 1-inch rings

Garnish
chopped fennel fronds and parsley

Turn your oven broiler on. Place bell peppers, jalapenos and Roma tomatoes on a rimmed baking sheet and coat with olive oil. Broil the vegetables for 5-7 minutes, using tongs to rotate frequently until the peppers have charred and the skin has bubbled. Transfer the vegetables to a large bowl and cover securely with plastic wrap. Set aside for 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to steam.

Peel the skins off the peppers and discard along with the stems and seeds. Next, peel and discard the skins of the Roma tomatoes.

Place a large stock pot or dutch oven over medium heat on the stove. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil and allow the oil to begin to slightly shimmer. Add the onions, celery and fennel inside the pot and cook until they have softened and become translucent—you do not want them to brown. Add the garlic, red pepper flakes and cook for an additional minute until fragrant. Pour in the wine and allow the liquids to come to a boil. Add the roasted peppers, Roma tomatoes, chopped fresh tomatoes, clam juice and tomato juice. Add the thyme, parley, tarragon, bay leaf, ½ tablespoon sea salt and peppercorns. Allow the liquids to come a rolling boil, lower heat and simmer, partially covered for 1½-2 hours. The liquids will nearly have reduced by half.

Pass the stock to a fine strainer and discard the vegetables and aromatics. Pour the stock into a large clean pot, add the saffron threads and lower the heat to a simmer for several minutes to allow the saffron to bloom and flavor the stock. Taste the broth and add additional sea salt as needed. Bring the stock back to a boil and add in the crab and lobster—cover and cook until the shells have become pink and the flesh becomes almost fully opaque. Stir in the clams, mussels and cover the pot. Allow them to cook for about 2 minutes until they just begin to open. Gently stir in the shrimp, fish, calamari and allow them to cook over a simmering heat—avoid cooking the fish in a rapid boil as they will get tough. Once the last seafood items turn opaque, taste the broth again and adjust with additional sea salt and pepper as needed.

Ladle the seafood into a bowl and pour the hot broth over it. Sprinkle with chopped fennel fronds, chopped parsley and serve immediately with warm bread.

Enjoy!

Note: This stock can definitely be made ahead of time so double or triple the batch and keep some in your freezer for a chilly night!

Seafood

Crispy Black Cod with Uni {Sea Urchin} Risotto

Black Bass with Uni Risotto

Crispy Black Cod over Uni Risotto.

You need this in your life. You really, REALLY do.

And the truth of the matter is, we made this incredibly decadent dish earlier this year at a Family Dinner though I didn’t post it because I wasn’t a fan of the pictures. But I came across them again while I was digging through my external hard drive and found my mouth watering.

It was so damn good.

Uni (Sea Urchin)

Seeing how we try our darnedest to try and not make the same dish twice for Family Dinner, I knew it would be awhile before I had the chance to rephotograph it. So I apologize for the photo quality but trust me on this, you’ll love this dish.

It was a collaboration between my seestrah T and I. She wanted a luscious fish and although we would usually turn to sea bass, we opted for black cod since it’s much more affordable. Sea bass has a very high oil content which keeps it wonderfully moist and almost buttery once cooked. Black cod mirrors the rich and decadent textures of sea bass but there are a TON of bones in them. So make friends with your fish monger and let them do the work for you.

Black Bass with Uni Risotto

I was in charge of the starch component of the dish and thought risotto would be wonderful with the tender fish. To send things over the top, I chose to make uni risotto by using my base risotto recipe but stirred in lots of pureed uni towards the end. The briny, mildly sweet flavor it brought to the rice was such a wicked compliment to the cod.

Here in Southern California, shelled uni can be found in the sashimi sections of Japanese and other Asian grocery stores. And if you’re feeling really adventurous, you can buy them whole in their spiny shells and remove them at home. I, for one, am okay with not shanking myself and opt to get them prepackaged.

Black Bass with Uni Risotto

And since more uni is always better in my book, we had to top off the whole thing with 1-2 extra pieces. If you’re going to do it, do it right.

Right?

Right.

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Crispy Black Cod with Uni {Sea Urchin} Risotto
Serves 4

Ingredients:

12 ounces fresh uni (sea urchin )
4¼ cups seafood stock (ie. lobster, shrimp, etc.), divided
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
1 cup diced white onion
1 tablespoon minced garlic
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
½ teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
1 cup Arborio rice
½ cup dry white wine
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
kosher salt
black pepper
4 pieces black cod, skin-on, de-boned (5-6 ounces each)
vegetable oil
chopped chives to garnish

Take all but 4-6 pieces of uni and put it in a blender with ¼ cup seafood stock. Pulse until it becomes smooth and set aside. Alternatively, you can use an immersion blender or hand-whisk the uni into the stock. The latter method will not have as smooth of a finish.

Heat the remaining seafood stock in a medium saucepan and keep warm over low heat.

Heat the olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter in a pot (or large, deep set skillet) over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté until softened and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Add the garlic, red pepper flakes, thyme leaves, rice and stir quickly until the rice is well coated and opaque—about 1-2 minutes.  Stir in the wine and cook until the liquid is nearly all evaporated.

Ladle in 1 cup of the hot stock into the rice. Simmer and slowly stir over medium-low heat until the rice has absorbed the liquid. Add the remaining stock, 1 cup at a time. Continue to simmer and constantly stir, allowing the rice to absorb each addition of stock before adding more. Once done, the risotto should be slightly firm and creamy–approximately 25 minutes in total. Stir in the pureed uni, cheese and remaining butter. Check for seasonings and adjust with the kosher salt and pepper.

While the risotto cooks, heavily season both sides of the cod with black pepper and salt. Using a sharp knife, score the skin side of the fish. Choose a skillet that can handle a high level of heat (ie. cast iron, stainless steel, etc.) Heat the skillet over high heat so that it becomes screaming hot. Once it reaches the desired temperature, add a few tablespoons vegetable oil and swirl it around the skillet. Carefully place each fish, skin side down into the oil. Using a spatula, gently press down on the fish so that they don’t curl up on the sides. Cook the first side of the cod for about 3 minutes — depending on the thickness. Be careful not to flip the fish before the skin has crisped up and formed a crust. Once the first side has cooked, about 2/3 way through, flip and cook for an additional 2 minutes. Remove the fish from the skillet.

Spoon the risotto into the dishes. Place one piece of cod on top of the risotto and then place 1-2 pieces of uni atop the fish. Sprinkle each plate with chopped chives and serve immediately.


Seafood · Sponsored

B.L.E.A.T.S. Sandwiches

B.L.E.A.T.S.

This week we’re giving one of my favorite ingredients some love.

Something so versatile, quick to prepare and that can send almost anything over the top.

Yep……

The beloved Egg.

B.L.E.A.T.S.

Pizza? Throw an egg on it…..

Pasta? Throw an egg on it…..

Sandwiches? Throw an egg on it…..

Salads? Throw an egg on it…..

Ramen Noodles? DEFINITELYThrow an egg on it…..

B.L.E.A.T.S.

Eggs have that magical ability to bring almost anything it touches to the next level. When adding a poached or runny fried egg to a dish, it becomes something so decadently transcendent—unctuous, sinful, delicious.

All that with just an egg!

B.L.E.A.T.S.

To close out National Sandwich Month and for my next contribution to Safest Choice™ Darling Dozen, I thought I would whip out a hearty and fun sandwich…. B.L.E.A.T.S.

B-acon

L-ettuce

E-gg

A-vocado

T-omato

S-almon

Oh yes…I went there.

B.L.E.A.T.S.

It all starts with an easy sriracha mayo I mix up to hold everything together or you can use any other spread that suits your fancy.

Wasabi mayo, pesto, garlic aioli, dijon mustard……

You get the gist….

B.L.E.A.T.S.

Next comes the salmon that is simply seasoned with kosher salt and then pan seared until it’s crispy on the exterior but still moist and tender in the middle. I happened to have a large fillet here but if you can’t find one big piece, just grab a couple smaller fillets.

Then, I cracked a few Safest Choice™ pasteurized eggs in the skillet and fried them until the edges were crisp and the yolks had just barely set.

I’m all about an ooey-gooey egg yolk…..it makes it seem a bit sinful—but don’t feel guilty. I sure as heck don’t.

B.L.E.A.T.S.

Once that’s all done, everything gets layered in between some hamburger buns or rolls. It truly is a behemoth of a sandwich and incredibly messy to eat.

But so wonderfully worth it!

And if you can’t get a little messy at home while enjoying some B.L.E.A.T.S. then you’re just not living life.

B.L.E.A.T.S.

Want to learn more about our friends from Safest Choice™? Then head on over here and while you’re at it, check out some more egg-a-licious recipes on their site!
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B.L.E.A.T.S. (Bacon, Lettuce, Egg, Avocado, Tomato & Salmon) Sandwiches
Serves 4

Ingredients:

½ cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon sriracha chili sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 garlic clove, finely minced
kosher salt
1 pound fillet salmon, skinned and deboned
3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
4 large Safest Choice™ pasteurized eggs
½ small lemon
1 small tomato, sliced
1 small avocado, sliced
8 strips cooked bacon
4 lettuce leaves
4 hamburger buns or rolls

In a small bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, sriracha, sesame oil, garlic and 2-3 pinches of kosher salt. Cover and refrigerate the sriracha mayonnaise.

Liberally season the salmon fillet with salt on both sides. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 tablespoons of oil and swirl it around to coat the bottom of the skillet. Carefully lay the salmon fillet into the skillet. Allow the salmon to sear, undisturbed, for about 4-5 minutes depending on the thickness of the fillet. The salmon should be about ¾ cooked through. Gently flip the fillet and allow it to brown on the other side for another 2-3 minutes until the center is barely pink. Remove from the skillet and transfer to a large plate to rest.

Use paper towels to wipe the interior of the skillet. Heat ½ tablespoon of the oil over medium-low heat. Crack 2 Safest Choice™ pasteurized eggs in the skillet and fry until the center has set and the whites are opaque. Sprinkle each egg with salt. Transfer the fried eggs to a plate and repeat with the remaining oil and eggs.

Squeeze the lemon over the rested salmon fillet and cut into four even pieces.

Assemble the sandwiches by spreading sriracha mayonnaise inside each of the hamburger buns/rolls. Top the bottom of each bun/roll with lettuce, avocado slices, tomato slices, bacon strips, salmon piece and then a fried egg. Place the top of each bun/roll on and serve.

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*DISCLOSURE: As a brand ambassador for the Safest Choice™ Darling Dozen, I was compensated for the creation of this recipe and post. However, as always, all opinions are my own.*

Seafood

Ceviche de Pescado

Ceviche de Pescado

I know y’all must be tired of me complaining about the weather…..

But it’s HAWT IN HERRE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And muggy.

Bleh.

But I can’t help it! I’m a SoCal wussy when it comes to weather and I am dyyyyiiiiinnnnggg.

Like Dead.

I’ll miss you.

Ceviche de Pescado

But before I pass on to the afterlife, let me pull this oldie but goodie out to share with you that is an absolute MUST during the summer— Ceviche de Pescado.

Ceviche of all sorts is quite popular in my neck of the woods having its roots in Mexican and Latin cuisines. It’s essentially a dish comprised of fish (or other seafood) that is “cooked” in citrus juice and spices. Since the acidity from the citrus “cooks” the fish, there’s no needs to crank on the stove or oven to make this little number—which is one of the reasons it’s perfect for warm days.

This time around I used a basic approach with the ceviche but depending on the region of Latin America, you can add just about anything such as corn, sweet potatoes, plantains, or even a tomato sauce. I also chose to use red snapper for this batch but any fresh, white fish will do……or even shrimp, scallops, octopus–the ocean is the limit!

But one thing is a must…..since you’re not using any heat in the preparation of this dish, you have to use the freshest proteins you can get your hands on.

How can you tell?

Sashimi grade labeled fish or products from a trusted fishmonger is generally a safe bet. But when in doubt—smell it. If it smells fishy–skip it.

Ceviche de Pescado

Oh…in case you were worried, my puggle turned on the air conditioner while I was passed out and I miraculously sprung back to life.

That clever little puppy. ❤

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Ceviche de Pescado
Servings 4-6

Ingredients:

 1½-2 pounds firm white fish fillets, evenly diced (ie. snapper, tilapia, bass, etc.)
¼ cup fresh orange juice
1 cup fresh lime juice
zest of 1 lime
1 serrano chili, seeds removed and finely diced
½ tablespoon finely minced garlic
1 red bell pepper, diced
½ small red onion, finely diced
¼ cup chopped cilantro
½ cup diced tomatoes
1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon ground coriander
2-3 pinches cayenne pepper
2 tablespoon olive oil
kosher salt
black pepper

 In a large, non-reactive bowl, gently combine the fish, orange juice, lime juice, lime zest, serrano chili, garlic, bell pepper and red onion. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for 60 minutes. The fish should turn white and opaque.

Drain and discard all but ¼ of the liquid from the bowl. Fold in the cilantro, tomatoes, cumin, coriander, cayenne, and olive oil. Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper. Serve immediately with additional lime wedges, hot sauce, diced avocados, and tortilla chips.